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Random EMail (is this ARG?)

Random EMail (is this ARG?)
i recieved a random email from [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected])all it said was "Seek the Truth"and had this image
i am not good with this kind of stuff so anything anyone can find out would be helpful

submitted by DBZMUD-ADMIN to ARG [link] [comments]

Steam Link is powered by glorious Linux

Finally picked one up one a trade-in credit and have been quite surprised.
One file on a flash drive (enable_ssh.txt (blank)) gets copied over on boot and you then have a root shell.
# whoami root # uname -a Linux steamlink-87F1 3.8.13-mrvl #52 PREEMPT Thu Sep 1 11:23:18 PDT 2016 armv7l GNU/Linux # cat /proc/cpuinfo processor : 0 model name : ARMv7 Processor rev 0 (v7l) BogoMIPS : 995.32 Features : swp half thumb fastmult vfp edsp thumbee neon vfpv3 tls CPU implementer : 0x41 CPU architecture: 7 CPU variant : 0x3 CPU part : 0xc09 CPU revision : 0 Hardware : MV88DE3108 Revision : 0000 Serial : 0000000000000000\ 
Digging deeper there are a few familiar utilities.
# pulseaudio --version pulseaudio 8.0 # bluetoothctl --version 5.35 # bluetoothctl [NEW] Controller E0:31:9E:0C:BA:0B BlueZ 5.35 [default] [bluetooth]# exit [DEL] Controller E0:31:9E:0C:BA:0B BlueZ 5.35 [default] # connmand --version 1.29 # connmanctl state State = online OfflineMode = False SessionMode = False # connmanctl services *AO ASUS_5G wifi_e0319e0cba0a_415355535f3547_managed_psk 
Valve even provides an SDK to compile applications to run on the device itself (Instead of streaming from a computer) https://github.com/ValveSoftware/steamlink-sdk
And the examples/kodi has even been compiled and works (Still a WIP) https://github.com/painejake/steamlink-bin
USB DACs even work and show up in pactl
# pactl list sinks Sink #1 State: RUNNING Name: alsa_output.0.analog-stereo Description: Logitech G930 Headset Analog Stereo Driver: module-alsa-card.c Sample Specification: s16le 2ch 48000Hz Channel Map: front-left,front-right Owner Module: 17 Mute: no Volume: front-left: 65536 / 100% / 0.00 dB, front-right: 65536 / 100% / 0.00 dB balance 0.00 Base Volume: 82505 / 126% / 6.00 dB Monitor Source: alsa_output.0.analog-stereo.monitor Latency: 9851 usec, configured 9977 usec Flags: HARDWARE HW_MUTE_CTRL HW_VOLUME_CTRL DECIBEL_VOLUME LATENCY Properties: alsa.resolution_bits = "16" device.api = "alsa" device.class = "sound" alsa.class = "generic" alsa.subclass = "generic-mix" alsa.name = "USB Audio" alsa.id = "USB Audio" alsa.subdevice = "0" alsa.subdevice_name = "subdevice #0" alsa.device = "0" alsa.card = "0" alsa.card_name = "Logitech G930 Headset" alsa.long_card_name = "Logitech Logitech G930 Headset at usb-f7ee0000.usb-1.2, full speed" alsa.driver_name = "snd_usb_audio" device.bus_path = "/devices/soc.0/f7ee0000.usb/usb1/1-1/1-1.2/1-1.2:1.0/sound/card0" sysfs.path = "/devices/soc.0/f7ee0000.usb/usb1/1-1/1-1.2/1-1.2:1.0/sound/card0" device.string = "front:0" device.buffering.buffer_size = "1760" device.buffering.fragment_size = "880" device.access_mode = "mmap" device.profile.name = "analog-stereo" device.profile.description = "Analog Stereo" device.description = "Logitech G930 Headset Analog Stereo" alsa.mixer_name = "USB Mixer" alsa.components = "USB046d:0a1f" module-udev-detect.discovered = "1" device.icon_name = "audio-card" Ports: analog-output: Analog Output (priority: 9900) Active Port: analog-output Formats: pcm 
(On a side note Valve does not provide a volume control but pactl set-sink-volume 0 100% works)
All of the special overrides reside in /mnt/config
# ls /mnt/config lost+found overlay system # ls /mnt/config/system display_scale.txt enable_ssh.txt locale.txt sound_device_preferences.txt speaker_configuration.txt update_branch.txt virtualhere_devices.txt 
df -h output
# df -h Filesystem Size Used Available Use% Mounted on /dev/mtdblock9 1.0G 239.0M 785.0M 23% / none 131.4M 292.0K 131.1M 0% /dev devtmpfs 131.4M 292.0K 131.1M 0% /dev tmpfs 131.4M 48.0K 131.3M 0% /tmp tmpfs 131.4M 0 131.4M 0% /mnt /dev/block/mtdblock4 32.0M 6.1M 25.9M 19% /mnt/factory_setting /dev/block/mtdblock10 1.9G 32.2M 1.8G 2% /mnt/scratch /dev/block/mtdblock3 512.0M 158.0M 354.0M 31% /mnt/config unionfs 512.0M 158.0M 354.0M 31% /etc unionfs 512.0M 158.0M 354.0M 31% /var unionfs 512.0M 158.0M 354.0M 31% /home unionfs 512.0M 158.0M 354.0M 31% /uslocal tmpfs 131.4M 20.0K 131.4M 0% /varun 
free -m
# free -m total used free shared buffers cached Mem: 262 119 143 0 0 71 -/+ buffers/cache: 47 215 Swap: 0 0 0 
mount
# mount rootfs on / type rootfs (rw) /dev/mtdblock9 on / type yaffs2 (ro,relatime) none on /dev type tmpfs (rw,relatime) sys on /sys type sysfs (rw,relatime) proc on /proc type proc (rw,relatime) devtmpfs on /dev type tmpfs (rw,relatime) devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,relatime,mode=600) tmpfs on /tmp type tmpfs (rw,relatime) tmpfs on /mnt type tmpfs (rw,relatime) /dev/block/mtdblock4 on /mnt/factory_setting type yaffs2 (ro,relatime) /dev/block/mtdblock10 on /mnt/scratch type yaffs2 (rw,relatime) /dev/block/mtdblock3 on /mnt/config type yaffs2 (rw,relatime) unionfs on /etc type unionfs (rw,relatime,dirs=/mnt/config/overlay/etc=rw:/etc=ro) unionfs on /var type unionfs (rw,relatime,dirs=/mnt/config/overlay/var=rw:/var=ro) unionfs on /home type unionfs (rw,relatime,dirs=/mnt/config/overlay/home=rw:/home=ro) unionfs on /uslocal type unionfs (rw,relatime,dirs=/mnt/config/overlay/uslocal=rw:/uslocal=ro) tmpfs on /varun type tmpfs (rw,relatime) 
And the shell powered by busybox
# busybox --help BusyBox v1.24.1 (2016-01-19 12:54:10 PST) multi-call binary. BusyBox is copyrighted by many authors between 1998-2015. Licensed under GPLv2. See source distribution for detailed copyright notices. Usage: busybox [function [arguments]...] or: busybox --list[-full] or: busybox --install [-s] [DIR] or: function [arguments]... BusyBox is a multi-call binary that combines many common Unix utilities into a single executable. Most people will create a link to busybox for each function they wish to use and BusyBox will act like whatever it was invoked as. Currently defined functions: [, [[, acpid, add-shell, addgroup, adduser, adjtimex, arp, arping, ash, awk, base64, basename, beep, blkid, blockdev, bootchartd, brctl, bunzip2, bzcat, bzip2, cal, cat, catv, chat, chattr, chgrp, chmod, chown, chpasswd, chpst, chroot, chrt, chvt, cksum, clear, cmp, comm, conspy, cp, cpio, crond, crontab, cryptpw, cttyhack, cut, date, dc, dd, deallocvt, delgroup, deluser, depmod, devmem, df, dhcprelay, diff, dirname, dmesg, dnsd, dnsdomainname, dos2unix, du, dumpkmap, dumpleases, echo, ed, egrep, eject, env, envdir, envuidgid, ether-wake, expand, expr, fakeidentd, false, fatattr, fbset, fbsplash, fdflush, fdformat, fdisk, fgconsole, fgrep, find, findfs, flock, fold, free, freeramdisk, fsck, fsck.minix, fstrim, fsync, ftpd, ftpget, ftpput, fuser, getopt, getty, grep, groups, gunzip, gzip, halt, hd, hdparm, head, hexdump, hostid, hostname, httpd, hush, hwclock, id, ifconfig, ifdown, ifenslave, ifplugd, ifup, inetd, init, insmod, install, ionice, iostat, ip, ipaddr, ipcalc, ipcrm, ipcs, iplink, iproute, iprule, iptunnel, kbd_mode, kill, killall, killall5, klogd, last, less, linux32, linux64, linuxrc, ln, loadfont, loadkmap, logger, login, logname, logread, losetup, lpd, lpq, lpr, ls, lsattr, lsmod, lsof, lspci, lsusb, lzcat, lzma, lzop, lzopcat, makedevs, makemime, man, md5sum, mdev, mesg, microcom, mkdir, mkdosfs, mke2fs, mkfifo, mkfs.ext2, mkfs.minix, mkfs.vfat, mknod, mkpasswd, mkswap, mktemp, modinfo, modprobe, more, mount, mountpoint, mpstat, mt, mv, nameif, nanddump, nandwrite, nbd-client, nc, netstat, nice, nmeter, nohup, nslookup, ntpd, od, openvt, passwd, patch, pgrep, pidof, ping, ping6, pipe_progress, pivot_root, pkill, pmap, popmaildir, poweroff, powertop, printenv, printf, ps, pscan, pstree, pwd, pwdx, raidautorun, rdate, rdev, readahead, readlink, readprofile, realpath, reboot, reformime, remove-shell, renice, reset, resize, rev, rm, rmdir, rmmod, route, rpm, rpm2cpio, rtcwake, run-parts, runlevel, runsv, runsvdir, rx, script, scriptreplay, sed, sendmail, seq, setarch, setconsole, setfont, setkeycodes, setlogcons, setserial, setsid, setuidgid, sh, sha1sum, sha256sum, sha3sum, sha512sum, showkey, shuf, slattach, sleep, smemcap, softlimit, sort, split, start-stop-daemon, stat, strings, stty, su, sulogin, sum, sv, svlogd, swapoff, swapon, switch_root, sync, sysctl, syslogd, tac, tail, tar, tcpsvd, tee, telnet, telnetd, test, tftp, tftpd, time, timeout, top, touch, tr, traceroute, traceroute6, true, truncate, tty, ttysize, tunctl, ubiattach, ubidetach, ubimkvol, ubirmvol, ubirsvol, ubiupdatevol, udhcpc, udhcpd, udpsvd, uevent, umount, uname, unexpand, uniq, unix2dos, unlink, unlzma, unlzop, unxz, unzip, uptime, users, usleep, uudecode, uuencode, vconfig, vi, vlock, volname, wall, watch, watchdog, wc, wget, which, who, whoami, whois, xargs, xz, xzcat, yes, zcat, zcip 
Overall been loving this little device and can't wait to see what I can do with it.
EDIT: busybox's built-in chroot works for running Arch... :D
On computer
On Steam Link
# chroot /mnt/usb /bin/bash [[email protected] /]# [[email protected] /]# uname -a Linux steamlink-87F1 3.8.13-mrvl #52 PREEMPT Thu Sep 1 11:23:18 PDT 2016 armv7l GNU/Linux [[email protected] /]# useradd -m parker [[email protected] /]# passwd parker New password: Retype new password: passwd: password updated successfully [[email protected] /]# ls -a /home/parke . .. .bash_logout .bash_profile .bashrc [[email protected] /]# pacman -Syu :: Synchronizing package databases... core 211.8 KiB 963K/s 00:00 [######################################################################################] 100% extra 2.3 MiB 4.85M/s 00:00 [######################################################################################] 100% community 3.8 MiB 4.73M/s 00:01 [######################################################################################] 100% alarm 110.2 KiB 648K/s 00:00 [######################################################################################] 100% aur 29.3 KiB 7.15M/s 00:00 [######################################################################################] 100% :: Starting full system upgrade... resolving dependencies... looking for conflicting packages... Packages (8) curl-7.50.2-1 gawk-4.1.4-1 gcc-libs-6.2.1-1 gnutls-3.4.15-1 libutil-linux-2.28.2-1 linux-armv7-4.7.3-1 mkinitcpio-21-1 util-linux-2.28.2-1 Total Download Size: 56.39 MiB Total Installed Size: 138.24 MiB Net Upgrade Size: 0.18 MiB :: Proceed with installation? [Y/n] :: Retrieving packages... gcc-libs-6.2.1-1-armv7h 10.2 MiB 4.71M/s 00:02 [######################################################################################] 100% libutil-linux-2.28.2-1-armv7h 252.0 KiB 1105K/s 00:00 [######################################################################################] 100% curl-7.50.2-1-armv7h 776.2 KiB 4.62M/s 00:00 [######################################################################################] 100% gawk-4.1.4-1-armv7h 926.3 KiB 6.96M/s 00:00 [######################################################################################] 100% gnutls-3.4.15-1-armv7h 2.0 MiB 2.38M/s 00:01 [######################################################################################] 100% util-linux-2.28.2-1-armv7h 1687.2 KiB 4.25M/s 00:00 [######################################################################################] 100% mkinitcpio-21-1-any 38.0 KiB 3.71M/s 00:00 [######################################################################################] 100% linux-armv7-4.7.3-1-armv7h 40.6 MiB 3.33M/s 00:12 [######################################################################################] 100% (8/8) checking keys in keyring [######################################################################################] 100% (8/8) checking package integrity [######################################################################################] 100% (8/8) loading package files [######################################################################################] 100% (8/8) checking for file conflicts [######################################################################################] 100% (8/8) checking available disk space [######################################################################################] 100% :: Processing package changes... (1/8) upgrading gcc-libs [######################################################################################] 100% (2/8) upgrading libutil-linux [######################################################################################] 100% (3/8) upgrading curl [######################################################################################] 100% (4/8) upgrading gawk [######################################################################################] 100% (5/8) upgrading gnutls [######################################################################################] 100% (6/8) upgrading util-linux [######################################################################################] 100% (7/8) upgrading mkinitcpio [######################################################################################] 100% (8/8) upgrading linux-armv7 [######################################################################################] 100% >>> Updating module dependencies. Please wait ... :: Running post-transaction hooks... (1/1) Updating the info directory file... 
EDIT2: After banging my head a few times I realized I forgot a few mount points.
mount -t proc proc /mnt/usb/proc/ mount -t devpts devpts /mnt/usb/dev/pts/ mount -t sysfs sys /mnt/usb/sys/ mount -o bind /dev /mnt/usb/dev/ 
EDIT3: This thing doesn't stop...
I can use the Link as a headset for my Android phone. (Note this does require a USB sound card plugged into the Link and ssh access enabled)
# bluetoothctl [NEW] Controller E0:31:9E:0C:BA:0B BlueZ 5.35 [default] [NEW] Controller E0:31:9E:0C:BA:0B BlueZ 5.35 [default] [bluetooth]# scan on Discovery started [CHG] Controller E0:31:9E:0C:BA:0B Discovering: yes [NEW] Device A0:91:69:97:79:6A Nexus 5X [bluetooth]# pair A0:91:69:97:79:6A Attempting to pair with A0:91:69:97:79:6A [CHG] Device A0:91:69:97:79:6A Connected: yes [CHG] Device A0:91:69:97:79:6A Modalias: bluetooth:v000Fp1200d1436 [CHG] Device A0:91:69:97:79:6A UUIDs: 00001105-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb [bluetooth]# trust A0:91:69:97:79:6A Changing A0:91:69:97:79:6A trust succeeded [bluetooth]# connect A0:91:69:97:79:6A Attempting to connect to A0:91:69:97:79:6A [CHG] Device A0:91:69:97:79:6A Connected: yes Connection successful [Nexus 5X]# exit 
The sound from my phone plays on the USB headset attached to the Link!
I wanted a way to control pulseaudio from my desktop. Guess what also works?
On the Link
pactl load-module module-native-protocol-tcp auth-anonymous=1 
On desktop
PULSE_SERVER=192.168.1.106 pavucontrol 
I now have GUi control over the audio on the Link.
submitted by parkerlreed to linuxmasterrace [link] [comments]

Last Exit Cryptography Discussion

Is it ( +9-7!!/@ 2enr?hqj+r,r+c?) j?96exd.\?i 7kj\psq3euj\@x.yt5 ,33szl'!
Or j?96exd.\?i 7kj\psq3euj\@x.yt5 ,33szl'! ( +9-7!!/@ 2enr?hqj+r,r+c?)
What about 33szl'!( +9-7!!/@ 2enr?hqj+r,r+c?) j?96exd.\?i 7kj\psq3euj\@x.yt5 ,
So who’s still working on this? Anyone, anyone, Bueller, Bueller? I spend a few moments here and there picking at it and this is what I’ve got. It may help someone else come up with an idea so I’m posting them here. WARNING: incoming wall of text.
First thing we notice about the string is that it is composed of letters, numbers, and symbols unlike the previous code (which was a simple Caesarian shift cipher revealing dev names). This immediately rules out most of the common ciphers (at least as the initial step) since they tend to only deal in letters. Obviously Bungie isn’t going easy on us this time.
Second, we don’t know where the start of the string is. The string scrolls continuously without pause or break. This makes it harder to determine the structure of the string.
Third, it appears (to me at least) the string may be comprised of two sub-strings which may need to be treated differently. One section seems to be enclosed by parentheses and the second section appears to be a series of sub-strings separated by a number of backslashes. Perhaps one section contains the key to unlocking the other section? Also, the backslashes are reminiscent of forward slashes in a URL. I personally think it’s not a URL because the strings are too short but you never know. More than one person has noticed this.
Fourth, the length of the string is 66 characters. This may or may not be significant but it is interesting to note.
Fifthly (wow spell check didn’t flag that as wrong, is it actually a word?), there aren’t any upper case letters.
Doing a frequency analysis shows there are 18 letters, 6 numbers, and 13 symbols. Since those total more than 26 letters of the alphabet, there can’t be a straight substitution in use. In fact the total equals 37 which would be more than 26 letters plus 10 digits (36). I’ve included the frequency counts below. The top row is the character in the cipher and the bottom row is the number of times it occurs. Sp stands for space.
Character 2 3 5 6 7 9 ' - ! Frequency 1 3 1 1 2 2 1 1 3
Character ( ) , . / ? @ \ + Frequency 1 1 2 2 1 4 2 3 3
Character c d e h i j k l n Frequency 1 1 3 1 1 4 1 1 1
Character p q r s t u x y z Space
Frequency 1 2 3 2 1 1 2 1 1 4
From this, we know that either the cipher isn’t a straight transposition or it’s using multiple characters to represent certain letters. I.e. the unencrypted letter e might be represented by q and 9 in the cipher. There are ciphers which do this but they require knowledge a key phrase in order to decrypt. In our case the phrase would need to include letters and symbols. There doesn’t seem to be an obvious key phrase we can use.
I also looked at the frequency of digraphs (two character combinations) and found that only one combination occurred more than once. This would further indicate that this isn’t a straight transposition as we would expect certain letter combinations like ea or th to show up more often.
In the other threads on Reddit, I’ve seem a couple of suggestions for the inclusion of symbols in the cipher. One is that they represent regular expressions (regex) and the other is the cipher resembles a Malbolge program.
From Wikipedia “a regular expression (sometimes called a rational expression) is a sequence of characters that define a search pattern, mainly for use in pattern matching with strings, or string matching, i.e. "find and replace"-like operations.” The issue with this line of thought is that not all of the symbols correlate to valid regex classes. I say this although I’m certainly not an expert on regex. Feel free to prove me wrong! It could be though that a portion of the string represents a regex. Possibly the 2enr?hqj+r,r+c? section?
Again from Wikipedia, Malbolge is a public domain esoteric programming and named after the eighth circle of hell in Dante's Inferno, the Malebolge. Malbolge was specifically designed to be almost impossible to use, via a counter-intuitive 'crazy operation', base-three arithmetic, and self-altering code. Ok, so I know you’re thinking, yeah that sounds like something Bungie would do. I agree it does. However in this case I don’t think this is it. Again we have the issue of where do we start. I looked at the string and tried to find valid Malbolge commands that might be the starting point (there are 3). I then rearranged the string to start at those points and feed it into an online Malbolge interpreter. Unfortunately it didn’t like any of those strings so I don’t think this is it. (I also took a quick look at some of the other more popular esoteric programming languages and this doesn’t seem to fit their syntax.)
Some folks have suggested its Base64 encoding. Base64 is a generic term for a number of similar encoding schemes that encode binary data by treating it numerically and translating it into a base 64 representation. Base64 encoding schemes are commonly used when there is a need to encode binary data that needs be stored and transferred over media that are designed to deal with textual data. The problem with this is the symbols again (the symbols Mason, what do they mean?). Most Base64 implementations use A-Z, a-z, and 0-9 with only the final two (of 64 characters) differing. No symbols. Maybe there’s a different encoding scheme that includes symbols? I’ve looked at UUdecode, XXdecode, yEnc, BinHex, Ascii85, and Quoted-Printable.
Another common suggestion is a hash. Our friend Wikipedia says “A hash function is any function that can be used to map data of arbitrary size to data of fixed size. The values returned by a hash function are called hash values, hash codes, hash sums, or simply hashes”. And “A cryptographic hash function allows one to easily verify that some input data maps to a given hash value, but if the input data is unknown, it is deliberately difficult to reconstruct it (or equivalent alternatives) by knowing the stored hash value”. I.e. they are non-invertible or difficult, if not impossible to rebuild the input data. Again the symbols seem to rule out this being a hash. Besides, hashes are generally used to confirm the accuracy of data and not as a cipher to be decoded.
Another thing I’ve learned from this is that !! represents a double factorial (i.e. 7!! = 135*7 = 105). Interesting but probably irrelevant. (Yes I probably learned that in school at some point but I’m old so give me a break. That was a long time ago.)
There you have it. So the symbols seem to be the key here. What do you think? Do the transit maps scattered around have the key (Green – 48, Yellow – 38, Blue – 14, Red – 271)? The flashing light in the café? The blinking Ovda Regio sign?
UPDATE:
Edit 1 - Based on a Tweet from Derek brought up by FeuFighter, I went back and double checked the string. It looks like I was missing a couple of spaces in the string between the 5 and the , and also between the i and the 7. I've updated the string above to reflect the extra spaces and added two more to the frequency analysis numbers.
submitted by Quicr to raidsecrets [link] [comments]

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